POTATO EXPO SCHEDULE

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TUESDAY, January 6
2:00PM-6:00PMRegistration Open
WEDNESDAY, January 7
7:30AM-7:00PM Registration Open
1:00PM-7:00PM Trade Show Open
4:30PM-5:15PMOpening Session: Six Things You Need to Know About Potato Export Opportunities in the New Global Supermarket, Matthew Tripodi, Government & Trade Relations Manager, Euromonitor International
5:30PM-7:00PM Kick-off Reception in Trade Show
THURSDAY, January 8
7:00AM-5:00PM Registration Open
8:00AM-Noon Trade Show Open
8:00AM-9:00AM Breakfast in Trade Show
9:00AM-10:00AMGeneral Session: How to Market to People Who Are Not Like You: The New Market Segmentation, Kelly McDonald, Multicultural Marketing and Business Trends Expert
10:30AM-11:00AMEXPO Stage Session: Managing Diseases with Biopesticides in Potato Production
Noon-1:30PM Luncheon: Keynote Speaker, An Insider’s Look at Politics, the White House, and the Future of America, Chris Wallace, Veteran Journalist and Host of Fox News Sunday
1:30PM-5:00PM Trade Show Open
1:30PM-2:30PMMeet the Researchers at the Poster Sessions
2:00PM-2:30PMEXPO Stage Session: The Future of Truck Transportation, John Stenderup, Manager Western Growers Transportation Program, C.H. Robinson Worldwide Inc.
2:30PM-5:00PM Breakout Sessions: Chip, Fresh, Process, and Seed
5:00PM-6:30PM Networking Receptions
6:30PM-9:00PM Special Event: Plumtackee, Florida Hootenanny Hangout!
FRIDAY, January 9
8:00AM-9:30AM Breakfast General Session: Climate Change, Nuclear Power, and GMO ... What Does Science Tell Us?, Mark Lynas, Author and Advisor on Climate Change, Biotechnology, and Nuclear Power
9:30AM-11:30AMTrade Show Open
10:00AM-10:45AMClosing Session: Big Trends in Agriculture: What Ag Will Look Like in 2045, Jim Carroll, Agricultural Futurist, Trends, and Innovation Expert

TRADE SHOW HOURS

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TUESDAY, January 6
2:00PM-6:00PMExhibitor Registration
2:00PM-6:00PMExhibitor Move-In
WEDNESDAY, January 7
7:30AM-7:00PMExhibitor Registration
8:00AM-11:00AMExhibitor Move-In
1:00PM-7:00PM Trade Show Open
5:30PM-7:00PM Kick-off Reception in Trade Show
THURSDAY, January 8
8:00AM-NoonTrade Show Open
8:00AM-9:00AM Breakfast in Trade Show
1:30PM-5:00PM Trade Show Open
FRIDAY, January 9
9:30AM-11:30AM Trade Show Open
11:30AM-3:00PMExhibitor Move-Out

WEDNESDAY, January 7

 
 

7:00AM-5:00PM

7:30AM-7:00PM


1:00PM-7:00PM


4:30PM-5:15PM
















5:30PM-7:00PM

Pre-potato EXPO Meetings

Registration Open

Panzacola Registration

trade show open

Sebastian Ballroom

opening session

Six Things You Need to Know About Potato Export Opportunities in the New Global Supermarket

Matthew Tripodi, Government & Trade Relations Manager, Euromonitor International

EXPO Stage, Sebastian Ballroom

Total potato exports for the U.S. neared $1.8 billion last season, representing expansion of nearly $600 million in just four seasons – and there is much more to come. Global demand for U.S. agricultural products has never been higher, and the U.S. potato industry is benefiting. This must-see presentation will introduce the “New Global Supermarket;” highlight global market dynamics; key trends, forecasts, and consumption patterns; U.S. potato and potato product export performance; and major opportunities (and threats) to capture growth and expand your business. Don’t miss this chance to interact with Matthew Tripodi, international trade professional at Euromonitor International, the world’s leading strategic consumer insights company. Tripodi promises a compelling look at the world that will inspire you to reach new markets.

Sponsored by: 

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Kick-off Reception in trade show

Sebastian Ballroom

Sponsored by:

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THURSDAY, January 8

7:00AM-5:00PM


8:00AM-NOON

Registration Open

Panzacola Registration

trade show open

Sebastian Ballroom

8:00AM-9:00AM


9:00AM-10:00AM

breakfast in Trade show

Sebastian Ballroom

general session

How to Market to People Who Are Not Like You: The New Market Segmentation

Kelly McDonald, Multicultural Marketing and Business Trends Expert

Gatlin Ballroom A/B

Kelly McDonald is a nationally recognized marketing expert who has a deep specialization in multicultural marketing and business trends. McDonald will share her marketing insights and teach strategies and tactics for cultivating diverse consumers. She notes that diversity comes in many forms, and that gender, race, age, life stage, and hobbies or special interests are all ways in which people's differences are recognized. By recognizing these differences and tailoring products, messages, or marketing efforts to reflect consumers' uniqueness, McDonald will discuss how potato industry members can validate the importance of a consumer group to reach more audiences.

Sponsored by:

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10:30AM-11:00AM

expo stage Session

Managing Diseases with Biopesticides in Potato Production

Amanda Gevens, PhD, Assistant Professor and Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Wisconsin-Madison

EXPO Stage: Sebastian Ballroom

Potato diseases account for a significant portion of crop production costs and yield losses each year. A broad range of plant pathogens can impact quality and yield of potato plants both in the field and post-harvest in transit or storage. For some chronic diseases, fungicides are essential to protect yield and quality. Growers have an increasing number of biopesticide options available to integrate into their overall disease management programs. Understanding the modes of action of biopesticides is critical in making these products work for successful disease management. This presentation will address some of the basics of biopesticides including product categories, modes of action, and efficacy as they pertain to conventional potato systems.   

NOON-1:30PM

Luncheon: Keynote Speaker

An Insider's Look at Politics, the White House, and the Future of America

Chris Wallace, Veteran Journalist and Host of Fox News Sunday

Gatlin Ballroom A/B

Few journalists in the nation’s capital know the American political system like Chris Wallace, a three-time Emmy award-winning anchor for FOX News. Wallace will handicap the mid-term congressional and gubernatorial elections, what it might mean for the remainder of President Obama’s second term, and provide insight and a historian’s perspective into the race for the White House in 2016. He will provide behind-the-scenes anecdotes about Washington and the role of the media in the national dialogue. 

Sponsored by: 
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1:30PM-5:00PM

 

1:30PM-2:30PM

Trade show open

Sebastian Ballroom

Meet the Researchers at the PAA Poster SessionS

Sebastian Ballroom Foyer

 2:00PM-2:30PM









2:30PM-5:00PM

expo stage Session

The Future of Truck Transportation

John Stenderup, Manager, Western Growers Transportation Program, C.H. Robinson Worldwide Inc.

EXPO Stage, Sebastian Ballroom

With its constantly rolling inventory, the potato industry is ever-reliant on trucking. What developments have impacted transportation in recent years, and how will this affect the potato industry in the future? John Stenderup has spent the past seven years with C.H Robinson developing refrigerated transportation solutions for a variety of different industries. Throughout this time, Stenderup has worked closely with industry trade associations to help shippers utilize transportation more effectively with the goal to help drive efficiency in operations and cost-effectiveness throughout the supply chain.

Breakout Sessions

New in 2015! Breakout Sectors include four time slots (1 - 2:30-3:00PM; 2 - 3:10-3:40PM; 3 - 3:50-4:20PM; and 4 - 4:30-5:00PM) synchronized to allow attendees to move between the Chip, Fresh, Process, and Seed Breakouts as desired and select their preferred topic or speaker during each time block.

Go to the Breakout Session page for full descriptions. 

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Chip Breakout, Panzacola H3/4

Chip 1: Food Safety and Traceability Initiatives for the Chip Industry
Tom Dempsey, CEO, Snack Food Association
 
Chip 2: What’s in the Pipeline for Chip Variety Development?
David Parish, President, AIS Consulting LLC
 
Chip 3: Tuber Necrotic Viruses: Impacts on Tuber Quality and Farm Profitability
Jonathan Whitworth, Research Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS

Chip 4:Storage Rots in Chip Potatoes: The Case for Variety Resistance
Neil Gudmestad, PhD, University Distinguished Professor of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University

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Fresh Breakout, Panzacola H1/2

Fresh 1: How to Win in a Rapidly Changing Retail and Consumer Environment
Sherry Frey, Senior Vice President, Nielsen Perishables Group    

Fresh 2: Fresh Potato Category Performance: A Look at Retail Data
Sarah Reece, Global Retail Marketing Manager, United States Potato Board

Fresh 3: Sustainability: Marketing Opportunity or Requirement?
Jeff Dlott, PhD, President, SureHarvest

Fresh 4: Foodservice Trends and Potato Sales
Joe Pawlak, Senior Vice President, Technomic Inc.


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Process Breakout, Panzacola F3/4

Process 1: Global Trends in Potato Processing
Frank Finn, President, McCain Foods, USA

Process 2: Development and Commercialization of Potato Varieties for QSRs
Steve Vernon, Vice President of Quality and Innovation, J.R. Simplot Company
Mitch Smith, Quality Assurance Systems Director, McDonald’s USA, LLC

Process 3: Research Tells the Tale on Potato Nutrition
Maureen Storey, PhD, President and CEO, Alliance for Potato Research and Education


Process 4: Turning Spuds into Dollars – Transportation of U.S. Potato Exports 
Barry Horowitz, Principal, CMS Consulting Services


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Seed Breakout, Panzacola F1/2

Seed 1: Changes to the Management of Bacterial Ring Rot: Idaho’s Approach
Alan Westra, SE Area Manager, Idaho Crop Improvement Association

Seed 2: The New Soft Rot – Europe Battles Dickeya Solani
Minna Pirhonen, University Lecturer, Plant Pathology Laboratory, Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Helsinki

Seed 3: PVY and Other Emerging Viruses – Best Management Practices to Minimize Virus Levels in Seed Crops
Russell Groves, PhD, Vegetable Extension Specialist and Associate Professor, Department of Entomology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Seed 4: Herbicide Resistant Weed Management in Potato Cropping Systems
Pamela J.S. Hutchinson, PhD, Associate Professor and Potato Cropping Systems Weed Scientist, University of Idaho Aberdeen Research and Extension Center

5:00PM-6:30PM

Networking Receptions

Young Professionals Reception

Wekiwa 3

All POTATO EXPO attendees ages 35 and under are welcome to network with the next generation of potato industry leaders. 

Women in the Potato Industry Reception

Wekiwa 4

This special reception honors all women working in the potato industry. No RSVP needed – just stop by for a few minutes to meet and greet other women in the industry. 

Potato Industry Leadership Institute Alumni Reception

Wekiwa 8

Potato Industry Leadership Institute (PILI) identifies, develops and cultivates new leaders within the industry. Graduates of the annual eight-day program are invited to join their former classmates and alumni at this reception.

6:30PM-9:00PM

Special Event: Plumtackee, Florida Hootenanny Hangout!

Gatlin Terrace

Way back, deep in the “bayou savage” of the Florida swamps is assembled our little mythical settlement, Plumtackee. Join friends and colleagues for a whimsical night full of great music, cold beverages, and regional foods, and definitely a lot of laughs! So, grab a stool, find a spot on the front porch....and experience life in  Plumtackee, FL, at the Hootenanny Hangout!

Admission included with All-Access Pass, Spouse Registration, and Child Registration.

Sponsored by:

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FRIDAY, January 9

8:00AM-9:30AM

Breakfast general session

Climate Change, Nuclear Power, and GMO … What Does Science Tell Us?

Mark Lynas, Author and Advisor on Climate Change, Biotechnology, and Nuclear Power

Gatlin Ballroom A/B

Mark Lynas was born in Fiji, grew up in Peru and the United Kingdom and currently lives in Oxford, England. He is an environmental activist who has published extensively on the impacts of modern human activity on the earth. His books Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet and The God Species: Saving the Planet in the Age of Humans are often quoted during climate change discussions. He is also dedicated to honestly bringing science to the discussion about causes and solutions of the world’s environmental problems. He is committed to science-based solutions that will aid our ability to preserve both people and planet. Lynas champions science based environmentalism and is quick to criticize “anti-science environmentalism.” His ideas on the application of science to issues like nuclear power and GMO food production have caused shock waves through the environmental community.   

Sponsored by:

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9:30AM-11:30AM

 

10:00AM-10:45AM


Trade show Open

Sebastian Ballroom 

Closing Session

Big Trends in Agriculture: What Ag Will Look Like in 2045

Jim Carroll, Agricultural Futurist, Trends, and Innovation Expert

EXPO Stage, Sebastian Ballroom

No POTATO EXPO would be complete without a look ahead at big future trends in agriculture. Jim Carroll, an agricultural futurist and innovation expert, will look into his crystal ball and predict what agriculture will be like in 2045. Whether it's driverless tractors, weed-zapping robots, or data-transmitting crops, Carroll will forecast what farms might be like 30 years from now and encourage the potato industry to embrace high-velocity innovation. Carroll is recognized worldwide as a “thought leader” and authority on: global trends; rapid business model change; business transformation in a period of economic uncertainty; and the necessity for fast paced innovation. You will not want to miss his predictions.

Sponsored by:

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11:00AM-10:00PM

Post-potato EXPO MeetingS

 
 
 
 

pre/post MEETINgs


Tuesday, January 6

tuesday, JANUARY 6, 2015         7:30AM-NOON

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

Register at www.unitedpotatousa.com/meetings. For more information, contact George Martin at meetings@unitedpotatousa.com or 801.266.5050.

tuesday, JANUARY 6, 2015         NOON-1:00PM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

For more information, contact George Martin at meetings@unitedpotatousa.com or 801.266.5050.

tuesday, JANUARY 6, 2015         1:00PM-6:00PM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

Register at www.unitedpotatousa.com/meetings. For more information, contact George Martin at meetings@unitedpotatousa.com or 801.266.5050.

tuesday, JANUARY 6, 2015         1:00PM-6:00PM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

tuesday, JANUARY 6, 2015         9:30AM-11:30AM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD


Wednesday, January 7

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015        

Continental Breakfast: 7:30AM-8:00AM, Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

Potato Business Summit: 8:00AM-NOON, Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

Luncheon: NOON-1:00PM, Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

A comprehensive analysis of the global and North American potato industry, including: world commodity outlook; U.S. consumption trends; and 2015 planting outlook. No registration fee. Limited Space. Registration required by December 19 at http://www.PotatoBusinessSummit.com.

For more information, contact info@PotatoBusinessSummit.com or 801.266.5050.

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015          7:00AM-10:00AM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

For more information, contact Travis Blacker at (208) 360-9560 or travis.blacker@potato.idaho.gov

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015          7:30AM-9:30AM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

For more information, contact Paul Bethke at pbethke@wisc.edu or 608.890.1165.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015          8:00AM-9:00AM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

For more information, contact Hollee Alexander at hollee@nationalpotatocouncil.org or 202.682.9456.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015          9:30AM-NOON

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

For more information, contact David Walsh at 703-836-4500 ext. 213 or dwalsh@sfa.org.

 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015          10:00AM-NOON

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

For more information, contact Matt Lantz at matthewl@bryantchristie.com or 206.292.6340.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015          10:00AM-NOON

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

For more information, contact Stewart Gray at smg3@cornell.edu or 607-255-7844.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015          NOON-5:00PM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

For more information, contact David Fairbourn at david.fairbourn@uspotatoes.com or 303-369-7783.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015          1:00PM-5:00PM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

For more information, contact Sarah Reece at sarah@uspotatoes.com or 303.369.7783.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015         1:30PM-5:30PM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

Register at www.unitedpotatousa.com/meetings. For more information, contact George Martin at meetings@unitedpotatousa.com or 801.266.5050.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2015          9:30AM-11:30AM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

For more information, contact Robin Angelo at rangelo@uspotatoes.com.


Friday, January 9

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, JANUARY 9-10, 2015          1:00PM, Jan.9 - 11:30AM, Jan. 10

Rosen Shingle Creek, Rooms TBD

The 2015 NPC Annual Meeting is your opportunity to connect with grower leaders from across the country to shape public policy positions on issues impacting potato production and distribution. These policies have a real impact on the day-to-day operation of your business--make sure you have a say. To view the agenda and details about the meeting, click here. For more information, contact Hollee Alexander at hollee@nationalpotatocouncil.org or 202.682.9456.

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 2015          11:00AM-6:00PM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Rooms TBD

For more information, contact Robin Angelo at rangelo@uspotatoes.com or 303.369.7783.


Saturday, January 10

SATURDAY, JANUARY 10, 2015          7:30AM-11:00AM

Rosen Shingle Creek, Room TBD

For more information, contact Robin Angelo at rangelo@uspotatoes.com or 303.369.7783.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, JANUARY 9-10, 2015          1:00PM, Jan.9 - 11:30AM, Jan. 10

Rosen Shingle Creek, Rooms TBD

The 2015 NPC Annual Meeting is your opportunity to connect with grower leaders from across the country to shape public policy positions on issues impacting potato production and distribution. These policies have a real impact on the day-to-day operation of your business--make sure you have a say. To view the agenda and details about the meeting, click here. For more information, contact Hollee Alexander at hollee@nationalpotatocouncil.org or 202.682.9456.

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BREAKOUT SESSIONS

Thursday, January 8
2:30pm-5:00pm

Chip, Fresh, Process, and Seed-specific Breakout Sessions designed by growers will address top issues in the potato industry marketplaces.

New in 2015! Breakout Sectors include four synchronized time slots to allow attendees to move between the Chip, Fresh, Process, and Seed Breakouts between sessions. 

 

Session 1

2:30 - 3:00 PM

Session 2

3:10 - 3:40 PM

Session 3

3:50 - 4:20 PM

Session 4

4:30 - 5:00 PM

 Chip Food Safety and Traceability Initiatives for the Chip Industry What’s in the Pipeline for Chip Variety Development? Tuber Necrotic Viruses: Impacts on Tuber Quality and Farm Profitability    Storage Rots in Chip Potatoes: The Case for Variety Resistance  
Fresh  How to Win in a Rapidly Changing Retail and Consumer Environment  Fresh Potato Category Performance: A Look at Retail Data    Sustainability: Marketing Opportunity or Requirement?   Foodservice Trends and Potato Sales 
 Process Global Trends in Potato Processing Development and Commercialization of Potato Varieties for QSRs   Research Tells the Tale on Potato Nutrition Turning Spuds into Dollars – Transportation of U.S. Potato Exports 
Seed  Changes to the Management of Bacterial Ring Rot: Idaho’s Approach The New Soft Rot – Europe Battles Dickeya Solani    PVY and Other Emerging Viruses – Best Management Practices to Minimize Virus Levels in Seed Crops    Herbicide Resistant Weed Management in Potato Cropping Systems   

Chip Breakout

Panzacola H3/4

Chip 1: Food Safety and Traceability Initiatives for the Chip Industry

Tom Dempsey, CEO, Snack Food Association

America’s food safety and labeling laws should not be set by political campaigns or state and local legislatures. That is fundamental to the Snack Food Association’s advocacy initiatives to represent member companies’ interests at the federal and state levels. Dempsey, a 24-year veteran of the industry and former president of Utz Quality Foods, will discuss the food safety and traceability initiatives for the chip industry.

Chip 2: What's in the Pipeline for Chip Variety Development?

David Parish, President, AIS Consulting LLC

David Parish is an industry veteran in snack food manufacturing, agricultural production, research, development, and procurement. He served as senior director of agricultural operations and agricultural research and development for Frito-Lay, Inc., and vice president of operations and business development for CSS Farms, Inc. Parish currently runs AIS Consulting LLC, an agricultural consulting, research, and development-oriented firm. He will present the latest information on national chip varietal development progress and also weave in the initial findings of the nutrient study AIS has been conducting.

Chip 3: Tuber Necrotic Viruses: Impacts on Tuber Quality and Farm Profitability

Jonathan Whitworth, Research Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS

Several viruses can cause tuber necrosis such as Potato virus Y (PVY), Potato mop-top virus (PMTV), Tobacco rattle virus (TRV), and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and some are emerging as significant issues in commercial potato production. These viruses can cause measurable yield loss, impact tuber quality, and reduce their usefulness for chips, fries, and table-stock. These viruses sometimes cause similar symptoms, so lab testing is critical in order to correctly identify the virus and plan effective management. The different methods by which these viruses are transmitted can be a challenge to both growers and seed certification agencies. Each of these viruses has unique methods of transmission and will require targeted control strategies. Cultivar selection may also have a significant impact on virus movement and disease severity. Jonathan Whitworth will discuss the impacts of these viruses on potato production and he will highlight options for management that can reduce these impacts.

Chip 4: Storage Rots in Chip Potatoes: The Case for Variety Resistance

Neil Gudmestad, PhD, University Distinguished Professor of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University

Dr. Neil Gudmestad is a native of North Dakota and a graduate of NDSU (Ph.D., 1982). His research program is focused primarily on the biology of potato pathogens and the management of the diseases they cause. In this presentation, he will give data on susceptibility of fast-track varieties to the various rots, how they start and can be controlled, and how soft rot is usually a secondary issue. 

Fresh Breakout

Panzacola H1/2

Fresh 1: How to Win in a Rapidly Changing Retail and Consumer Environment
Sherry Frey, Senior Vice President, Nielsen Perishables Group

The retail landscape is shifting: category items are multiplying; the industry is moving toward a consumer-driven model; and on the other side of the register, consumers are better educated and becoming increasingly diverse. Sherry Frey of the Nielsen Perishables Group will draw on industry expertise and multiple Nielsen data sources to provide a full picture of the changing retail landscape, consumer priority areas and how to connect with them, and how these insights can drive more focused potato marketing strategies.    

Fresh 2: Fresh Potato Category Performance: A Look at Retail Data
Sarah Reece, Global Retail Marketing Manager, United States Potato Board

Information-based selling is vital for influencing potato category sales in the retail channel, and the United States Potato Board continues to invest heavily in order to provide the industry with the most effective data resources available. Sarah Reece will show how using USPB-provided retail data will help enhance your category understanding and allow you to leverage your expertise with USPB resources to bring more value to every retail interaction. Understanding the data and USPB tools available to you will allow you to conduct a business review with retailers to identify opportunities for growth, build relationships, talk about retail trends, and ultimately increase sales.

Fresh 3: Sustainability: Marketing Opportunity or Requirement?
Jeff Dlott, PhD, President, SureHarvest

“Sustainability” has become another oft-used and very misunderstood term in the food marketing world. It is also a requirement that many retailers, processors, and foodservice establishments are placing on growers. U.S. potatoes are sustainably produced, as shown by the abundance of farms that have been growing potatoes for many years across numerous generations. But is this something we can use to better market our potatoes? Dr. Jeff Dlott will help U.S. agricultural producers answer just that question and be prepared to better meet the numerous requirements being placed on producers in this realm.

Fresh 4: Foodservice Trends and Potato Sales
Joe Pawlak, Senior Vice President, Technomic Inc.

Close to half of all fresh potatoes are sold to the foodservice sector. The fresh potato industry has much to gain by improving their understanding of this sector and more effectively investing time and energy marketing to it. Further, foodservice is going through many changes in concepts, menus, and operational procedures to meet changing patronage patterns, tastes, and economic conditions. In this session, Joe Pawlak will look at how fresh potatoes fit into the foodservice sector and, more importantly, what can be done to better position potatoes within this sector.

Process Breakout

Panzacola F3/4

Process 1: Global Trends in Potato Processing

Frank Finn, President, McCain Foods, USA

Globally, French fries and other potato products are still loved by consumers, yet are often challenged by policy-makers. Numerous factors are affecting the growth of the global processed potato markets today: consumer and cultural trends, nutrition and policy trends, along with new research findings and product innovations. Ongoing investments in research, education, and innovation are needed to secure long-term market growth and sustainability throughout the value chain. Frank Finn of McCain Foods, USA will address these factors and their effect on the global market.

Process 2: Development and Commercialization of Potato Varieties for QSRs

Steve Vernon, Vice President of Quality and Innovation, J.R. Simplot Company
Mitch Smith, Quality Assurance Systems Director, McDonald’s USA, LLC

The development and commercialization of new and improved potato varieties are vital to the processed potato industry. The traditional time frame to fully introduce a new variety is nearly 20 years. In addition, it can take many years for significant flaws in new varieties to emerge. The processed potato industry implemented a new potato evaluation system to identify and fast-track varieties producing reduced acrylamide levels in French fries. This new evaluation system requires collaboration from breeders, growers, French fry processors, and experts from the quick service restaurant industry. Steve Vernon and Mitch Smith will focus on the improved variety development process including how QSR chains evaluate new varieties.

Process 3: Research Tells the Tale on Potato Nutrition

Maureen Storey, PhD, President and CEO, Alliance for Potato Research and Education

It might shock you to know that many nutrition scientists and registered dieticians are unaware of the contributions potatoes make to a healthy diet. Many of these key influencers think of potatoes – and French Fries in particular – as just a starch or empty calories. Doing the research and getting the facts to this important group can change the perception of potatoes in both the academic and nutrition communities, and ultimately have an impact on consumers. Last October, the Alliance for Potato Research and Education (APRE), using the latest available potato nutrition research, provided the facts on potato nutrition to a National Academy of Science’s Institute of Medicine (IOM) WIC review committee. Much of this research was conducted or supported by the potato industry through APRE. During this session, Dr. Maureen Storey from APRE will share the facts about potato nutrition as presented to the IOM review committee and other nutrition professionals. The story the research tells is compelling.

Process 4: Turning Spuds into Dollars – Transportation of U.S. Potato Exports

Barry Horowitz, Principal, CMS Consulting Services

Currently more than 18 percent of U.S. potato production is exported. Frozen product makes up 64 percent of that export total. Efficient and timely international shipping is critical to continued success in growing U.S. potato exports. This session will focus on the hows and whys of the international shipping business and the West Coast infrastructure and labor issues that could limit our export opportunities.

Seed Breakout

Panzacola F1/2

Seed 1: Changes to the Management of Bacterial Ring Rot:  Idaho’s Approach

Alan Westra, SE Area Manager, Idaho Crop Improvement Association

In response to recent concerns regarding bacterial ring rot, Idaho has implemented a number of changes to its seed certification program. These changes represent a multi-pronged approach to management of this disease that are intended to demonstrate farm and program cleanliness, prevent the inadvertent introduction of infected seed lots into the both the seed and commercial industry, and identify and remediate the problem when BRR is detected. To eliminate BRR from the seed supply and keep it out of the seed supply, growers need practical options. Alan Westra will discuss the changes that made to seed certification in Idaho, their rationale, current status, and expected outcome.

Seed 2: The New Soft Rot – Europe Battles Dickeya Solani

Minna Pirhonen, University Lecturer, Plant Pathology Laboratory, Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Helsinki

European scientists discovered a new kind of soft rot bacterium in 2004 and there were subsequent finds in several European countries. This bacterium has now been characterized as a novel species called Dickeya solani. The disease, which acts like a more aggressive strain of blackleg, is spread through seed and physical contact or contaminations of machinery and equipment. Research in Europe is currently underway to characterize the reason for the rapid spread and superior virulence of D. solani when compared to the previously prevailing soft rot bacteria. Minna Pirhonen has been one of the leaders in evaluating the spread and adaptation of this bacterium in Europe. She will provide data on the most current scientific research being conducted on D. solani in Europe and to identify testing methods and techniques to prevent the introduction into areas where the pest is not present.

Seed 3: PVY and Other Emerging Viruses – Best Management Practices to Minimize Virus Levels in Seed Crops

Russell Groves, PhD, Vegetable Extension Specialist and Associate Professor, Department of Entomology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Viruses are the primary reasons for certification programs to reject seed lots. Planting clean seed as a part of an integrated management program is the most important virus management decision, but you cannot control what is planted on neighboring farms. Varieties differ in virus susceptibility and variety selection will impact the efficiency of rouging operations. Vector management is only one component of a more comprehensive IPM approach. Identifying the principal vector(s) of these viruses when they are present in fields allows for the development of a control program that limits virus spread and environmental impacts. Although the emerging soil borne viruses are not yet regulated by certification programs, they can dramatically impact seed quality. In this session, Dr. Russell Groves will address the emerging strategies to limit the impact of aphid-transmitted diseases like PVY.

Seed 4: Herbicide Resistant Weed Management in Potato Cropping Systems

Pamela J.S. Hutchinson, PhD, Associate Professor and Potato Cropping Systems Weed Scientist, University of Idaho Aberdeen Research and Extension Center

The most comprehensive herbicide resistant weed management programs are set up before herbicide-resistance becomes a problem. Managing production practices to prevent or delay the development of resistant weed populations requires an integrated and consistent approach. Understanding the modes of action of your crop protection options and the tendencies of your weed populations requires study and organization. Knowledgeable crop advisors, both public and private, can help you take advantage of the diverse set of tools and resources available to facilitate your success. In this session, Dr. Pamela Hutchinson will help you understand the latest approaches and tools to counter the development of resistant weeds on your farm.

PAA POTATO RESEARCH POSTER SESSIONS

Poster Sessions are available for viewing throughout the POTATO EXPO.

Stop by the Poster Sessions on Thursday, January 8, between 1:30pm-2:30pm to meet the presenters and learn more about how their research can benefit your operation.

 

The POTATO EXPO 2015 Poster Sessions provide a firsthand look at research that directly addresses potato production concerns. Discuss the latest research directly with the people who are tackling issues such as: PVY, Zebra Chip, Potato Mop-Top Virus, Verticillium Wilt, Psyllids, and Late Blight. This is your opportunity to meet one-on-one to discuss how their findings could impact and improve your operation.

Coordination and selection is facilitated by the Potato Association of America.  


Residual Effects of Rejuvenate on Potato Seed for Stem Management

Andy Robinson, Potato Extension Agronomist, North Dakota State University/University of Minnesota

Rejuvenate seed treatment has been shown to reduce stem number on aged seed. Grower practices vary greatly when treating seed. Some seed is fresh cut and planted without delay. Other seed is cut and stored for many weeks, allowing seed to suberize and providing flexibility for the planting schedule. This trial is designed to give insight into optimal treatment timing strategy. Two cultivars were treated with Rejuvenate at 21, 14, 7 days and 1 day prior to planting. In North Dakota, Rejuvenate reduced stem number when applied at 7 days and 1 day prior to planting, but had no effect at the other timings.

 

Source and Time of Potassium Fertilizer Application Influences Marketable Tuber Yield and Tuber Quality of Russet Potato

Dr. Samuel Y.C. Essah, Associate Professor of Agronomy and Horticulture, Colorado State University, San Luis Valley Research Center, Center, CO

In a study conducted at the San Luis Valley Research Center, Colorado State University, potassium acetate or potassium chloride was used as source of potassium (K) fertilizer. Potassium fertilizer was applied pre-plant, foliar applied, or as a combination of pre-plant and foliar application. Potassium acetate applied pre-plant, and as a combination of pre-plant and foliar application, increased marketable and premium size tuber yield of Mesa Russet significantly when compared to the control and potassium chloride treatments. Data from this study indicate that proper application timing of the appropriate K fertilizer can improve tuber yield and quality of Russet potato.

 

The Effects of Early Storage Management on Wound Healing and Processing Quality

Sherilyn Peck, Graduate Student, University of Idaho, Kimberly Research and Extension Center, Kimberly, ID

Early storage conditions can influence long term storability and quality of potatoes. Weight loss, processing quality, and disease development can be impacted by these conditions. Early storage temperatures affect wound periderm formation and processing quality of potatoes. Proper wound healing in storage is a critical part of early storage management to minimize shrinkage and disease, although prolonging conditions favorable for wound healing may not be beneficial. Studies will be presented on weight loss in commercial storages and the impact of temperature (45, 55 and 65F) on wound healing and processing quality of three varieties: Russet Burbank, Ranger Russet, and Clearwater Russet.

 

Performance of Early Maturing Potatoes for Chipping

Vanessa Currie, Research Technician, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON Canada

The Ontario potato processing industry requires a continuous supply of high quality product for their manufacturing facilities. Although many different potato varieties are used throughout the year, by late May to mid-June, the stored Ontario crop from the previous fall may be depleted. From this time until late July, Ontario chip processors must import U.S. potatoes at a high cost. This project examines early maturing potato lines for their potential use during this niche period. Breeding lines with early maturity and high chip quality were grown in replicated field plots at the Elora Research Station, ON in 2013 and 2014. Plots were harvested at 90 and 110 days maturities. Data will be presented for yield, specific gravity, chip colour, sucrose, and dextrose. 

 

Potato Late Blight Resistance Saves Resources

Christi Falen, Commercialization Research Agronomist, J.R. Simplot Company Simplot Plant Sciences, Boise, ID

Simplot is developing Innate™ potatoes to meet production, health, and environmental concerns. A major issue facing the potato industry is late blight with its devastating effects. Repeated fungicide applications and product loss cost valuable financial and natural resources. We are conducting field evaluations of potatoes that have resistance to late blight, can be stored at colder temperatures, and have lower asparagine levels for health benefits. We are seeing conventional potatoes die from late blight, while the same variety improved by Simplot is alive and growing, saving valuable resources. 

 

Strategies for Selecting Stable Common Scab Resistant Clones in a Potato Breeding Program

Felix M. Navarro, Research Manager, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI

Common scab (CS) by Streptomyces scabies is an important potato disease. CS can be avoided using resistant varieties. Clone evaluation is complicated by GxE interaction. We evaluated efficacy of screening CS resistance across multiple environments from 2006-2013. We compared the ability to evaluate CS resistance in dedicated CS trials (DST) and parallel standard breeding trials (SBT). Data analysis was able to separate CS-susceptible cultivars from resistant cultivars only for DST. We identified clones that outperformed CS-tolerant Pike, Russet Burbank, and Dark Red Norland. Approaches utilized offer useful information for breeding programs to improve selection efficiency for scab resistant clones.

 

Comparison of Antioxidant Activity of Purple Majesty with Pomegranate and Blueberries 

Sastry S. Jayanty, Associate Professor and Extension Specialist, San Luis Valley Research Center, Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Colorado State University, Center, CO

Dietary antioxidants from fruits and vegetables play an important role in preventing free radical-induced oxidative damage. Potato tubers with purple- and red-colored flesh contains high levels of phenolics and anthocyanins, as do pomegranates and blueberries. The present study evaluates the antioxidant potential of colored-flesh potato tubers in comparison with polyphenol-rich fruits, blueberries, and pomegranate juice. The potential antioxidant capacities of the potato tubers were similar to that of pomegranate and blueberry. The total antioxidant activity values per serving size of baked red and purple potatoes, blueberries, and pomegranate juice were also found to have comparable ranges.

 

Use of Asparaginase to Mitigate Acrylamide Formation

Katie Maloney, Senior Scientist, Novozymes North America Inc, Franklinton, NC

In 2002, Swedish researchers discovered the presence of high levels of acrylamide in various baked and fried foods, including French fries and potato-based snacks. One method for reducing the levels of acrylamide in food is to use the enzyme asparaginase to convert asparagine, a major precursor for acrylamide, into aspartic acid, thereby reducing the formation of acrylamide. This poster will cover how asparaginase is applied in the manufacture of French fries, potato granules, and extruded snacks. Effect of processing conditions on acrylamide formation and effectiveness of enzyme treatment will be presented.

 

Vacuolar Invertase Gene Silencing Decreases the Frequency of Sugar End Defects

Paul Bethke, Research Plant Physiologist, USDA and Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI

Sugar end defect tubers produce French fries with unacceptable darkening at one end. Sugar ends result when stress during tuber growth increases vacuolar acid invertase activity at one end of the tuber. Invertase produces reducing sugars from sucrose, and reducing sugars form dark-colored products and acrylamide, a suspected carcinogen, during frying. Vacuolar invertase gene expression was suppressed in Russet Burbank and Ranger Russet using molecular tools. Sugar end defects and acrylamide content in fried potato strips decreased in multiple transgenic lines. Thus, vacuolar invertase silencing can reduce a persistent French fry quality problem and a health concern related to dietary acrylamide.

 

Assessing the Risk of Zebra Chip Disease Liberibacter in Export Potatoes

Joseph E. Munyaneza, Research Entomologist, USDA-ARS, Yakima Agricultural Research Laboratory, Wapato, WA

Zebra chip, a new and economically important disease of potato in the United States, Mexico, Central America, and New Zealand, is associated with the new bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” transmitted to potato by the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli. There have been concerns that the zebra chip pathogen can be spread by infected potato tubers from infected to non-infected areas. Field studies were conducted in Washington to assess the risk of zebra chip-infected tubers spreading the disease in eight important potato varieties. Zebra chip-infected potato tubers generally do not germinate and if they do, produce disease-free or weak and short-lived plants, and do not play a significant role in zebra chip spread to new areas where the disease and potato psyllid are absent. Information from this research will benefit national and international trade of potato seed and fresh market.

 

Selection of Resistance to Tobacco Rattle Virus and Potato Mop-Top Virus in Potato Germplasm in Washington State

Charles R. Brown, Research Geneticist, USDA-ARS, Yakima Agricultural Research Unit, Prosser, WA

TRV and PMTV are necrotic viruses that internally damage potato tubers. Both are unusual in that they are vectored not by insects but rather a nematode and a fungus, respectively. There are many difficulties in artificially inoculating; hence, maintenance of infective fields is highly desirable. This poster will examine resistance to both viruses over several years of field trials.

 

 Field Evaluation of Potato Cultivars for Susceptibility to Potato Mop-Top Virus-Induced Tuber Necrosis

Neil C. Gudmestad, University Distinguished Professor/Plant Pathology, Department of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, Fargo ND

Potato mop-top virus (PMTV) is transmitted by the powdery scab fungus and is rapidly becoming one of the most important tuber necrosis viruses in the United States. The virus has been confirmed in six major potato-producing states since its introduction into the U.S. in 2003. Twenty-nine potato cultivars representing four market classes were assessed for susceptibility to PMTV-induced tuber necrosis in a field known to be infested. Susceptibility to PMTV-induced tuber necrosis among cultivars in each market class followed a continuum of resistant to susceptible. The results of this study provide growers with disease management options by avoiding highly susceptible cultivars and replacing them with resistant cultivars in the same market class. The current study will be expanded using funding recently obtained from the USDA-NIFA-SCRI program.

 

Suppression of Verticillium Wilt with Foliar Phosphite Application

Rick Peters, Research Scientist, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada

Phosphites are commonly used to manage diseases caused by oomycetes in potato agriculture. However, our team has documented the stimulation of general plant defence molecules by phosphite application contributing to overall plant health and suppression of a number of potato pathogens. This poster will highlight lab and field work pertaining to the use of phosphites to manage early dying caused by Verticillium spp. Suppression of fungal growth in the lab will be described as well as the results of ratings of an inoculated field trial and yield analysis. If the data is ready in time, we may also describe some PCR data pertaining to quantification of the pathogen in plant tissues.

 

Potato Psyllids Colonizing Oregon and Washington Potatoes: Regional Monitoring, Incidence of the Pathogen and Management Options 

Silvia I. Rondon, Associate Professor, Extension Entomologist Specialist, Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Oregon State University, Hermiston, OR

Zebra Chip disease in potatoes, caused by Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (Lso) and vectored by the potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli), leads to streaking of tubers and substantial losses in plant growth, quality, and yield. It was first observed in Mexico in 1994 and has since spread to major U.S. production areas including Oregon, Washington, and Idaho in 2011. Efforts to manage the disease are complicated due to:  1) the difficulty associated with predicting when and if psyllids and Lso will be present; and 2) detecting Lso bacterium within vector populations. This poster will discuss Pacific Northwest efforts to monitor vector populations, disease occurrence, and current management options for the region.

 

Oregon Potato Breeding and Variety Development: An Integral part of Tri-state Potato Breeding Program to Develop Varieties for the Pacific Northwest

Vidyasagar (Sagar) Sathuvalli, Assistant Professor, Potato Breeding and Genetics, Oregon State University, Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Hermiston, OR

The Oregon Potato Breeding and Variety Development program plays a key role in the Tri-State (Idaho, Oregon, and Washington) variety development program. Oregon breeding efforts focus on the four major market classes: Russets for processing, fresh market Russets, chip stock, and specialty varieties. Traits of importance include yield potential, biotic stress resistance (potato virus Y, verticillium wilt, Columbia root knot nematode, late blight, and zebra chip), abiotic stress resistance (drought and heat stress, cold sweetening), low acrylamide level, bruise resistance, storability, flavor, and phytonutrient content. Our program effectively integrates various molecular, genomic, and participatory breeding tools to increase breeding efficiency and to develop varieties for various market classes. 


Breeding for Potato Virus Y Resistance

David Douches, Professor, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

The various strains of Potato Virus Y (PVY) are vectored by aphids throughout the U.S. and it is difficult to keep potato seed clean. We need potato varieties that are PVY resistant. There is a genetic marker linked to the PVY resistance gene (Ryadg) from Solanum tuberosum Grp. Andigena on chromosome 11 that confers extreme resistance to current PVY strains. We have been crossing this resistance into the Michigan State University potato breeding germplasm and we now have advanced selections and parents that are PVY resistant for the round white chip-processing and table markets. Further crossing with these resistant lines is currently taking place and we are evaluating a large number of progeny for the PVY-resistance marker. 


Landscape Effects on the Epidemiology of Potato Virus Y

Andrei Alyokhin, Professor, School of Biology and Ecology, University of Maine, Orono, ME

Potato Virus Y is an important pathogen of potatoes that has a broad host range and could be transmitted by numerous species of aphids. Studies conducted in Oregon, Idaho, Wisconsin, and Maine used field surveys, transmission efficiency experiments, and advanced mathematical modeling to provide initial insights into the effects of surrounding landscape, non-host vegetation, and vector activity on the PVY epidemiology. Our results suggest that PVY management cannot be confined exclusively to potato fields.

 

 Biological and Economic Impacts of Emerging Potato Tuber Necrotic Viruses and the Development of Comprehensive and Sustainable Management Practices

Stewart Gray, Research Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS, Ithaca, NY 

Failure to control viruses affecting the seed potato industry has led to shortages of certified seed available, creating downstream hardship for commercial growers. Movement of seed and associated viruses across regions has contributed to the emergence of tuber necrotic viruses and expanded the significance of virus disease from strictly a seed issue to a quality issue impacting all industry sectors. A new national project aims to reduce the impact of tuber necrotic viruses by working with all industry sectors to adjust seed certification practices, provide on-farm risk management 


Evaluation of Vydate and Vertisan Programs for Reducing the Reliance on Fumigation in Potato Production

Mike Thornton, Professor of Plant Science, University of Idaho, Parma Research and Extension Center, Parma, ID

Use of systemic nematicides in combination with fungicides may provide an alternative to fumigation for the control of both soil-borne diseases and nematodes.  These programs also fit well with sustainability programs that seek to reduce the total amount of pesticides applied in potato production. Trials were conducted in south-central and south-western Idaho during 2013 and 2014 to compare potato yield and quality for pesticide programs that rely on the fumigant metam sodium to those that rely on Vydate-CLV and Vertisan. Vine senescence was slower in the Vydate/Vertisan treatments compared to Metam treatments and the non-fumigated check, resulting in slightly higher total yields and a shift in tuber size towards larger categories.  

 

Potato Mop-Top Virus: Molecular Characterization of an Emerging Virus of Potato

Hanu R. Pappu, Professor, Washington State University, Pullman, WA

Potato mop-top virus (PMTV; family Virgaviridae) was reported recently in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. To better understand the genetic diversity of the virus, the complete genome of an isolate from Washington State (WA) was characterized. Bioinformatic analysis of the viral genes of the WA isolate showed a close relationship with European isolates. RFLP analysis of corresponding DNA of RNA TGB and RNA CP suggested that the WA isolate is considered RNA TGB-II and RNA CP-B types, which are prevalent in Europe and other parts of world. Further studies to expand the genetic diversity investigations are in progress.

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